Word Limit


Word Limit: 800 – 1000
Due Date: 28/9/18

Since the Millennium Declaration was signed in the year 2000 by 189 of the 195 countries throughout the world. The United Nations established eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which they hoped to have completed by 2015. The United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals are focused on eradicating poverty which is connected to nearly all of the targets outlined in the Millennium Declaration.

Since the year 1990 the first goal to ‘eradicate extreme poverty and hunger’ has taken a huge step forward.
The target to reduce extreme poverty (less than $1.25 a day) by half was met in 2010, 5 years ahead of schedule. It dropped from 1.9 billion people in extreme poverty to only 836 million in the year 2015.
Although the effort to half the percentage of underfed people in developing countries has slightly missed the target by 1.25 percent, from 23.3 percent in 2000 to 12.9 percent in 2015. Reducing extreme poverty and hunger is vital to improving wellbeing in both developing and already developed countries.

The second Millennium Development Goal to ‘Achieve Universal Primary Education’ has also made significant progress through all of the targeted regions, receiving ‘high enrolment rates’ everywhere except Sub-Saharan Africa which has moderate enrolment.
The aim of the goal was to ensure that children universally – including both boys and girls – will be able to complete a full course of primary education by 2015.
In the year 2000, there were 100 million school-aged children that were not enrolled in school, compared to the 57 million children in 2015.
Education is a major factor that contributes to a country or state’s wellbeing. It is also one of the main causes of poverty in developing countries. Children and young adults need a good education to be able to read, write and do basic math so that they can apply and get well-paying jobs.

The sixth Millennium Development Goal to ‘Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Major Diseases’ has 3 main targets:
To halt by 2015 and have started to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS.
To achieve global access to treatment for HIV/AIDS for those who need it by 2010.
To have ceased and started reversal of the incidence of malaria and other major diseases by 2015.
Diseases like HIV/AIDS and Malaria are greatly affected by poverty and malnutrition. An estimated three billion people live on less than $2.50 per day, people living in poverty, especially in developing countries, are more likely to be infected with diseases like HIV/AIDS and Malaria.
The United Nations and other organisations have averted over 6.2 million deaths associated with malaria, reducing the mortality rate by 58 percent, and the incidence rate by a further 37 percent.

The final MDG is to ‘Develop A Global Partnership for Development’. From the year 2000 to 2014, support from developed countries reached 135.2 billion dollars. In comparison to 2000, the percentage of the global population with internet connectivity has increased from 6 percent to 43 percent in 2015. The main six aims of MDG 8 are:
To further develop an open, predictable, rule-based, non-discriminatory trading and economic system.
To address the special needs of the least developed countries.
To address the special needs of small island developing states and landlocked developing countries.
To deal exhaustively with the debt problems of developing nations.
To provide access to affordable essential drugs in the developing world – in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies.
To avail benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications, in collaboration with the private sector.
Developed countries also import valuable goods such as food, water and medicine as part of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), which has increased from 65 percent in 2000, to 79 percent in 2014.

In conclusion