In Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar


In Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, there are many unhinged speeches and conversations, but the most unexpected of all was Brutus’s speech for many reasons. While the crowd is agitated and scared knowing that their beloved ruler, Caesar, has just dead, also in the midst of looking for answers, Brutus walks in, and puts the crowd is in aw. The first piece of dialogue that stands out in Brutus’s speech is how he refers to his audience; “Romans, countrymen, and lovers”(3.2.127), this exhibits how much Brutus loves his country Rome, and how dear Romans are to him. Brutus has always been loyal to Caesar and uses his “honorability” to persuade the citizens he adds: “Believe me for my honor, and have respect to my honor that you may believe”(3.2.127), he is trying to get citizens focus on honour, and Brutus is determined to make the crowd aware of this, which is really significant, as the play progresses, he shortly then adds: “If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar’s… say that Brutus’ love to Caesar was no less than his, If anyone demands why Brutus rose against Caesar my answer is: not that i loved Caesar less but i loved Caesar more”(3.2.127), he notes to the audience that it was not for his selfish reasons to kill Caesar, moreover repeats it was for the best of Rome. Furthermore, articulating how dear Caesar was to him, it’s important to